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Classic Velocity Blog

Filtering by Tag: Goebel

Goebel

Classic Velocity

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Karl Goebel began as a producer of bicycle frames in 1937 in Bielefeld. It was bad timing as World War II broke out a few years later and the factory was eventually destroyed. They produced motorcycles for the first time in 1951 beginning with the Standard 50. Improvements followed as 50cc and 48cc motors from Ilo and Fichtel&Sachs were paired with strong frames to create well received machines in the marketplace. One of their best selling models was the GS4 Sport, but they also did well with models like the Piccolo, and the Avus. Goebel was one of the most prevalent marques to use the "semi- circular" frame which connected the front fork, the main backbone spar, the engine mount, and the swingarm mount, via a single length of tubular steel.

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Among other business deals, Goebel acquired the floundering Meister (see Remembering Meister), but decided not to continue that brand. Ironically, Goebel survived the tough economic times early on and stayed in business producing mopeds until 1984 when it declared bankruptcy.

Remembering Meister

Classic Velocity

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Bielefeld has a rich history of two wheeled production. Both Goricke and Durkopp had roots there, and many bicycle manufacturers did as well. Meister began with bicycles in the 1920s, but soon progressed to mopeds and single cylinder 2 stroke motorcycles. They dabbled in competition, achieving some success in Brussels in1930. War interrupted operations, and Meister did not return to production until 1949. They once again manufactured a variety of powered bicycles, mopeds, and scooters. They acquired Phanomen, and partnered with Mammut to provide even broader offerings. In the early 1950s, the Phanomen Élan was their top of the line model, which featured torsion rear suspension and telescopic forks.

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Meister used their own highly rated frame, but used engines from ubiquitous Ilo as well as from Fichtel&Sachs. Toward the end of the 1950s, Meister was facing the decline of the motorcycle and the rise of the automobile. Company leader, Mr Doppelt, became ill in 1957, and a deal was reached to sell to Goebel. The Meister and Mammot brands quickly disappeared as Goebel was more interested in the manufacturing plant.