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Classic Velocity Blog

Filtering by Tag: Glas

Glas Goes Goggo

Classic Velocity

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For a maker of farm equipment, Hans Glas GMBH has some very interesting and critical connections to the car and motorcycle industry (see BMW 2002 Touring). This particular connection revolves around their decision in 1950 to enter the motorcycle industry by producing a scooter. It was said that Andreas Glas was inspired by a trip to the Verona International Agricultural Fair in 1949. Prototypes appeared soon after, and in 1951 the first production units went on sale. They were branded Goggo, and featured a fully enclosed design similar to Italian scooters of the time. They were offered in 125cc, 150cc, and 200cc displacements, with associated increase in power and top speed. All featured telescoping font forks, spare wheel, 12 liter tanks, and 12 volt electrical systems.

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The 200cc versions offered 4 speed transmissions versus the 3 speed on the lower models. There was a 200 Deluxe model which offered a slightly longer wheelbase, and load capacity. A sidecar version was added soon after, and then in 1953, a 3 wheeled utility model was introduced to tackle industrial needs. The 3 wheeler was available in a variety of configurations. Goggo never made it to the US, but there were attempts as the Ad above indicates, and a few have made their way in over time.  Over 46,600 units were sold over the five year period from 1951 to 1956. Glas then ceased producing scooters in order to concentrate on the microcar and delivery vehicle markets with their Goggomobil brand. Glas eventually became part of BMW in 1966.

 

BMW 2002 Touring

Classic Velocity

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In the late 1960s, small "estate" cars were emerging as practical transportation with good carrying capacity. Most were hatchbacks like the Austin 1100, the Peugeot 204, and the Renault 16. Opel was also working on an Opel Manta variant. BMW was looking for ways to further capitalize on the 1600/2002 platform, and they also wanted to offer a hatchback to compete in that segment. In 1967 BMW purchased the Glas automobile company, and it had a small hatchback in the lineup which had dismal sales. However, the car was used as the basis for the design proposal solicited from Bertone and Michelotti. It took until 1971 for the cars to reach production with the first 2002-based ones actually badged as 2000 Touring, and 2000tii Touring. 

Other than the body, the cars were identical to the regular 2002s. Engine, transmission, suspension, and electrical were all the same. On the body, the cars were virtually the same up to the A pillar. Facing the cars head on, you would be hard pressed to tell a Touring from a Coupe/Sedan. The rear overhang was shorter to give the rear good proportions, and there was strengthening to make up for the absence of the rear bulkhead. It retained the signature Hofmeister kink, and a generous greenhouse. The angle of the windshield was changed to better suit the body style. A signature feature are the ventilation grilles on each rear pillar. Despite continuing until April of 1974, and getting all of the running gear updates from the 73 Model, the Touring models kept their round tail lights. For the interior, the changes began behind the front seats, with split fold-down rear seats. The front seats stayed with the 71 Model seats until the end, much like the round tail lights. Standard materials were vinyl with houndstooth cloth inserts.

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More than 30,000 Touring models were produced in 1600/1602, 1800/1802,and 2000/2002 variations over the 3 year period in which they were made. The 2000/2002 models were the vast majority of that number. In 2012, BMW Classic fully restored a 1972 2000 Touring to as new condition (with a few upgrades like 170bhp !), but there are also lots of variations out there that never came from the factory such as Alpina versions and a Turbo version. 

No such version ever left the factory, but nicely done !

No such version ever left the factory, but nicely done !


 BMW Touring 2000

  • 3-door coupe body type
  • RWD (rear-wheel drive), manual 4-speed gearbox
  • petrol engine with displacement: 1990 cm3 / 121.2 cui, advertised power: 73.5 83 kW / 99 111 hp / 100 113 PS ( DIN SAE ) / 5500 5800, torque: 157 Nm / 116 lb-ft / 3500
  • dimensions: outside length: 4110 mm / 161.8 in, wheelbase: 2500 mm / 98.4 in
  • base curb weight: 1030 kg / 2271 lbs, gross weight GVWR: 1450 kg / 3197 lbs
  • top speed: 170 km/h (106 mph) (declared by factory);
  • accelerations: 0- 60 mph 10.3 s, 0- 100 km/h 10.9 s (declared by factory), 1/4 mile drag time (402 m) 17.5 s (a-c simulation) (see detailed performance data review)
  • fuel consumption and mileage: average estimated by a-c: 10.2 l/100km / 27.8 mpg (imp.) / 23.1 mpg (U.S.) / 9.8 km/l


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  BMW Touring 2000tii

  • 3-door coupe body type
  • RWD (rear-wheel drive), manual 4-speed gearbox
  • petrol engine with displacement: 1990 cm3 / 121.2 cui, advertised power: 95.5 108 kW / 128 145 hp / 130 147 PS ( DIN SAE ) / 5800 5800, torque: 178 Nm / 131 lb-ft / 4500 
  • dimensions: outside length: 4110 mm / 161.8 in, wheelbase: 2500 mm / 98.4 in
  • base curb weight: 1030 kg / 2271 lbs, gross weight GVWR: 1450 kg / 3197 lbs
  • top speed: 185 km/h (115 mph) (declared by factory);
  • accelerations: 0- 60 mph 8.9 s, 0- 100 km/h 9.4 s (declared by factory), 1/4 mile drag time (402 m) 16.5 s (a-c simulation) (see detailed performance data review)
  • fuel consumption and mileage: average estimated by a-c: 8.9 l/100km / 31.6 mpg (imp.) / 26.3 mpg (U.S.) / 11.2 km/l
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