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1958 BMW R60

Filtering by Category: Garage Update

Tail Lens

Classic Velocity

A silly accident damaged the tail light lens and a new one had been sitting in the box for months. The replacement process was pretty straight forward once you master the little wire clips that hold the lens in place.  

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A Complete Machine

Classic Velocity

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It really did take this long to put the R60 back together. There was a conspiracy of missing ordered parts, procrastination, lack of time, other projects, etc. However, I was determined not to be that guy. You know, the one who took a vehicle apart and has made no progress many years later, and yet wont sell because he is gonna fix it up any day now. That guy. In a sudden flurry of activity over a long weekend, the new pistons, rings, and gudgeon pins got installed. The heads went back on, the timing was set, and just like that, the machine was complete again.

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With new oil and fresh gas, it fired on the second kick. However, once under load, it ran poorly. Back at the garage, I left it overnight and then re-torqued the heads and reset all of the valves. I also replaced the spark plugs. It took a dozen kicks for it to fire, but once it did it was immediately smoother. Once warm, a quick ride confirmed that it was feeling like its former self. I am taking it easy with new pistons, but barring further problems, the R60 is back !

Pistons and Beer

Classic Velocity

Well, the big news with the R60 made the main blog (see Runs Great, Needs Pistons) . That lead to some serious garage time and some waiting for new pistons, rings, etc to arrive. That lead to some fiddling with the center stand springs which were not correct. That lead to some searching for the correct springs which I know I have. That lead to some inability to find said springs. That lead to some opening of a few Spatens and watching the Isle of Man TT....

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Floatation

Classic Velocity

Well, part of the poor running at wide open mystery has been revealed. One carb was certainly running much richer than the other. After another round with the carb balancer, I decided to swith the floats just to see what would happen. While pulling out the float from the richer carb, I noticed that it had managed to develop fluid inside. Shaking it produced the unmistakable sound of fluid sloshing around. Not a lot, but apparently enough. I had seen small leaks develop before that let gas in, but there was no apparent leak, and even leaving it out for days while I waited on a new float produced no discernible change !! Not the slightest scent of gasoline, no difference in the amount of fluid. Even the weight was about the same. It is obviously condensation, but this was a first. Next I will apply some heat......Meanwhile, a brand new shiny float showed up and was installed. I opted to stay with the more expensive brass float rather than the plastic alternative. 

Gauging Progress

Classic Velocity

One of the more cosmetic areas on the bike that I am not opposed to tackling is the only gauge it has. Typically, the position on top of the headlight nacelle exposes it to the ravages of the sun. Since paper is involved, the speedometer can quickly look much older and in much poorer condition than the rest of the bike. Fortunately, places like Hucky's sell repair/restoration kits for the speedometer. After removing the speedometer, I noted that it was correctly stamped 1958. The one in my 65 R50/2 is actually stamped 1964. In my typical fashion, I did not want to do a complete restoration of the speedometer, I just wanted it to look presentable. This means that I left the original face of the speedometer intact. I cleaned up the needle, replaced the battered bezel, and of course replaced the rubber seals. Back in the bike, it looked much improved, but not too good. Just the way I like it.

Jetlag

Classic Velocity

Some new jets arrived from Bing, and I spent a few hours installing them and rebalancing the carbs. Voila ! The big lag seems to be gone. We now have smooth acceleration, and the bike is fine under load. A few finer adjustments may still remain, but things are much better and I took the bike for a 45 minute ride to test things out. It seemed to run even better as I went along, but that may just be in my head. I got back and stuck the carb balancer on the bings again, and they seem to be pretty even. I am much happier for now, and can concentrate on getting a few more hours on the engine before I change the oil, check the valves, and re-torque the head. The bike is also lower than the R50/2 and the Euro bars make it feel much sportier. So far, so good.